PRINTER FRIENDLY | TEXT

RGS is about...

 

Hunting ruffed grouse and woodcock and enjoying the other wildlife

that share the place where they live and respecting the habitat that

provides them with food, cover from predators, shelter, and a place to

 

 

breed and rear their young.

 

Actively managing those young forests or “habitats” by using tools,
like controlled fire and forest cutting, recognized as effective by Aldo

 

Leopold, the father of the wildlife management profession.

 

 


 

Educating the public about the habitat requirements of these birds,

both game and non-game and gaining broad public support to actively

manage using controlled fire and timber harvest, and that clear-cutting

as a forest management tool, when properly applied, is ecologically

sound.

 

Explaining that these birds live in a place that, unless actively managed,

will give way to trees which shade out the plants that are home to ruffed

 

 

grouse, woodcock, many songbirds, rabbits and deer.

 

 


 

Walking in the woods and pausing at the sound of what seems to be an

 

 

old John Deere tractor and realizing it is a grouse drumming in spring.

 

 


 

Going afield with the expectation of bagging a grouse or “patridge” or a

“timberdoodle” and being overtaken with pride as your dog carries its head

high as it moves into the wind, locks on point and waits for you to flush the

bird.

 

Uttering an “aw shucks” when the bird flushes across an opening and

evades what you thought were well-placed number 8s.

 

Inviting friends to share a fine meal of grouse and all the trimmings and

listening to how your spouse backed you up on the shot after yours felled

a young aspen.

 

Banquets where friends with a common interest in these birds and their

conservation come together to have fun and provide the funding needed

to make it all happen.


 It is really not about us at all, it is about our kids, grandkids

and their kids for, without our help, these places will not be

there for them or the birds to enjoy.